2020 Fantasy Football Draft Kit

2020 Fantasy Football: Six Dart Throws

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In the year of sports that never was, we face challenges in fantasy football which skirt the boundary of irresolute perplexity. With only a month before the great fantasy football unknown, we prepare ourselves as best we can inside a pea-soup fog of uncertainties.

Fortunately, ready league commissioners are aware of the concerns and are bolstering their redraft rules with extra IR slots. Some are extending draft rosters so that waiver rushes do not become too frequent and overly intrusive for the smooth probity of their leagues.

This year, your dart throws at the end of a draft may turn out as more than just the usual “hit or miss” droppable commodities we ascribe them in better times. And if your league commissioner is providing an extended bench for 2020, you may have some extra room for these unsung players to add into your roster.

2020 Fantasy Football: Six Dart Throws

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Kendrick Bourne, WR, San Francisco 49ers

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Brandon Aiyuk, a first-rounder the 49ers had a particular itch to secure in the draft, may hold the higher target ascendancy in light of Deebo Samuel‘s questionable injury status beyond Week 1. But Bourne too is getting close scrutiny in fantasy circles as the natural choice to pick up those extra targets and red zone looks.

Bourne is entering his fourth year but has yet to cross the respectable level of 800+ yards. However, he remains a favorite red-zone utility of the 49ers quarterbacks over the past two seasons, hauling in five touchdowns last year from Jimmy Garoppolo. So he’s already a natural late-round Best Ball scoop for enthusiasts of that format.

Bourne is a solid dart throw. With rookies like Aiyuk lacking a proper preseason evaluation and Deebo Samuel‘s entrance delayed, Bourne holds a significant spot in the pecking order of the 49ers: at least for the first few weeks of 2020.

DeeJay Dallas, RB, Seattle Seahawks

You really can’t go wrong by taking a deep shot at a Seattle running back. Pete Carroll has always tipped the balance of his offensive scheme in favor of the running attack.

Travis Homer and Carlos Hyde can feature in this reckoning, but I’d throw a deep dart for Dallas. DeeJay Dallas comes from The U in Miami – a school known for producing some fine NFL players and runnings backs, including presumptive HOFer Frank Gore.

It is true that so many bodies are ahead of Dallas, notably Chris Carson and Rashaad Penny. But both lead backs are in injury limbo with Carson coming off a serious hip fracture scare requiring rehab and Penny already on schedule to begin the season on PUP.

One thing Carroll does is give his running backs a shot. I expect DeeJay Dallas will get his chance.

Jace Sternberger, TE, Green Bay Packers

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We’re in an era where heavily targeted tight ends practically do not exist. In 2019, just four had 100+ targets from their quarterback, two over 90, and just five over 80.

You might luck into anticipated production from tight ends outside the small elite, but generally, all tight ends are hit and miss outside the top 12 or so.

Therefore, you can do worse than scooping up 2nd year Jace Sternberger late in your draft. His ADP is give or take TE31. Sternberger has the advantage of being in an offense where the Packers decided to forego their obvious needs during the draft and fill up on everything in the skill positions except for a single wide receiver.

With one big wide receiver, Devin Funchess, taking the opt-out, Sternberger has one less obstacle to secure a spot with Allen Lazard as the other size receiving option for Aaron Rodgers to aim at.

Sternberger is a dart throw in the truest sense. He has virtually no stats from 2019 with just a single target in 60 snaps. He did score a garbage-time touchdown against the 49ers in the conference final.

DeAndre Washington, RB, Kansas City Chiefs

With Damien Williams out of the backfield, all the attention in this potentially lucrative backfield has centered around Clyde Edwards-Helaire.

It’s justified of course. But if you recall, Andy Reid did not operate a workhorse backfield for most of the 2019 season. In fact, the Kansas City backfield resembled more of a committee with LeSean McCoy and Damien Williams. Even Darrel Williams saw the field when everyone was healthy.

Washington comes with good credentials from the Raiders. His experience will push Darwin Thompson‘s viability to work as the complement to CEH in the pecking order.

Based on how Reid follows a “bring along” system with rookies coupled with a further lack of any preseason evaluation, CEH’s contributions might not become fully evident until October.

Washington is an excellent dart throw at the end of your draft as the most experienced running back currently rostered on the Chiefs.

Antonio Gandy-Golden, WR, Washington Football Team

Part of this unusual 2020 is the changes happening in Washington, the team with no mascot. They are also a team without Kelvin Harmon. Harmon revealed his season ending torn ACL as the presumptive training camp approached.

This news automatically raised interest in the potential of the wide receivers behind Terry McLaurin in Washington. Gandy-Golden and the plural RB/WR rookie Antonio Gibson were names of hype on twitter.

Both AGG and Gibson are reasonable dart throws, but Gibson’s role could end up closer to a “real” football asset. Gibson somewhat reminds me of some old days hype over Tavon Austin. But then again, Ron Rivera runs an offense quite differently with players like that. Christian McCaffrey is essentially an RB/WR who made the fantasy big-time under Rivera.

Gandy-Golden is the purer dart throw in terms of regularly lining up as a starter with ample snap counts. He might fall well short of a decent target share however. Much depends on how Rivera decides to scheme with Haskins. This is where the real problem lies. If McLaurin had another quarterback, where would he rank? Somewhere better.

Beyond all this downside, there really is sound upside for darting Gandy-Golden. The opportunity certainly must arise considering the lack of offensive weaponry. Opportunity counts for much in fantasy guesswork.

Irv Smith Jr., TE, Minnesota Vikings

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Kyle Rudolph remains in the mix for big man targets from Kirk Cousins. However, Rudolph’s snap share dropped significantly (900s to 700s) with Irv Smith Jr. joining the team in 2019. Irv Smith was one of those rare rookie tight ends to actually challenge a well-established player in the position for the starting lineup.

Because of Irv’s quick rise in the Vikings’ offense, many anticipate he will overtake Rudolph both in snaps and targets in 2020. But by what margin is the great unknown.

What we do know is that Irv is an efficient receiver, hauling in 77% of his targets last year. 311 yards on 36 catches was a sound start.



Make Irv Smith Jr. an automatic late-round target in any case. He’s definitely a breakout possibility.


Visit the F6P Fantasy Football page for more advice, including all 32 Fantasy Football Team Previews to get you prepared for the 2020 season

About Richard Savill

Richard is an NFL Fantasy Football Writer and Editor of Fantasy Six Pack. Host of The Fantasy Edge Podcast. FantasyPros Contributor. Member of the FSWA. Richard is known for his "outside the box" insight into NFL fantasy football. Winner of the 16-Team 2015 FSWA challenge.

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