Fantasy Football

2020 Fantasy Football Week 15 Drop List

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Welcome to the 2020 Fantasy Football Week 15 Drop List!

If you’ve made it this far, you’re doing something right. Presumably, you’re in the playoffs and you’re in the upper echelon of your league.

For most, the semi-finals are on the horizon and each coming week is bound to get incrementally tougher.

It’s never fun to lose. But even worse are missed opportunities.

Opportunities are sitting on the waiver wire, ripe for the picking. But in order to make the most of these chances, fantasy owners must cut ties with those bringing down the rest of the pack. It’s one of the toughest parts of fantasy football— dropping players that you’ve invested time and confidence in— but it’s essential to the evolution of a championship squad.

Without further ado, it’s time to dig into the playoff version of this week’s chopping block.

2020 Fantasy Football Week 15 Drop List

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Quarterback

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Carson Wentz, Philadelphia Eagles (47% Rostered)

The Eagles pulled a huge upset against the New Orleans Saints in Week 14, but it was no thanks to Carson Wentz.

Wentz had been struggling all season and it seemed as though it was time for a change. Jalen Hurts, Philadelphia’s second-round selection in the 2020 NFL draft got the nod on Sunday, replacing the former Pro-Bowler as the starter for the Eagles.

Hurts took advantage of his first NFL start, by outdueling Taysom Hill and the strong Saints defense en route to a 23-20 victory, bringing the Eagles’ record to 4-8-1.

Prior to being benched, Wentz was leading the NFL in interceptions with 15. Considering the injuries to his offensive liven as well as receiving corps, not all the blame can go to Wentz. Still, Wentz looked nothing like the MVP candidate from 2017.

Hurts took the opportunity in stride and looks to be the starter, at least for the remainder of the season, so it’s safe to drop Wentz.

Philip Rivers, Indianapolis Colts (41% Rostered)

The Colts were on a different level than the Raiders on Sunday.

Part of their success can be attributed to Philip Rivers, who has been excellent as of late. On Sunday, Rivers went 19 for 28 for 244 yards and a pair of touchdowns.

So why drop a quarterback who seems to be coming into his own?

The answer is Jacoby Brissett who has been eating up opportunities near the goal line. Indy has been deploying Brissett heavily in redzone situations through the use of the wildcat formation. As a result, Rivers’ ceiling is capped in fantasy terms.

Although Rivers is finally finding chemistry with T.Y. Hilton, fantasy owners should look elsewhere for QB1-level fantasy numbers. Considering two tough matchups against the Texans and Steelers, it’s time to move on from the wily veteran for your playoff matchups.

Running Back

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Ezekiel Elliott, Dallas Cowboys (99% Rostered)

Ezekiel Elliott signed a lucrative contract this past offseason and will potentially net $90,000,000 over the next six years.

Unfortunately for Jerry Jones and the Cowboys, Zeke hasn’t been close to living up to his side of the deal.

Against a suspect Bengals defense, Elliott only managed 14 total touches for 59 yards and was held out of the endzone once again. In fact, Elliott hasn’t scored a rushing touchdown since Dak Prescott sustained a season-ending injury back in Week 5.

Backup running back, Tony Pollard, has been eating away at Elliott’s share as well, seeing 13 touches last week, while cashing in on a seven-yard score in the fourth quarter.



Elliott’s yardage has been terribly underwhelming as of late, making him a touchdown-dependant option for fantasy managers. The biggest issue is his lack of ability to punch the ball into the endzone. With Pollard’s explosive play as of late,  owners of the Ohio State alumnus should look elsewhere during the playoffs.

As talented as he is, playoff-bound fantasy owners should get off the Zeke bus and look for options elsewhere.

Devin Singletary, Buffalo Bills (73% Rostered)

The Bills employed a pass-heavy offense on Sunday night, decisively beating Big Ben and the Steelers.

The game script, which called for an air attack despite the cold and snowy weather, certainly wasn’t in Singletary’s favor. In total, Singletary rushed seven times for 32 yards, while reeling in one catch for two yards. This was his lowest yardage since Week 10.

The Bills looked to Zack Moss late in the contest, where he turned 13 touches into 43 yards. The rookie had more carries and total yardage than Singletary, but it seems like none of Buffalo’s running backs can be trusted during the fantasy semi-finals.

Singletary has only one touchdown on the year and doesn’t seem to be worth rostering considering his inability to reach pay dirt.

Wide Receiver

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Jalen Reagor, Philadelphia Eagles (21% Rostered)

Jalen Reagor has elite speed.

When he was at TCU, he struggled to unlock his full potential, because the quarterback play was atrocious and the offensive line would often be parted like the Red Sea.

Then when he got into the NFL, he had Carson Wentz, a Pro-Bowl QB— or so he thought.

A shell of his 2017 self, Wentz has been demoted to QB2, and Jalen Hurts has taken the reins. Hurts looked good in Philadelphia’s upset over the Saints, but it’s clear that his propensity to run at the drop of a dime will affect the deep ball. Reagor, being the speedster he is, needs time to beat defenders for big gains. With Hurts being inclined to scrambling, Reagor’s big-play potential declines.

Reagor is averaging 37.8 receiving yards per game and has only one receiving touchdown on the season. Time to send him out to pasture.

Sammy Watkins, Kansas City Chiefs (54% Rostered)

Sammy Watkins would be a top-2 option on nearly every receiving corps in the league.

In Kansas City, however, it’s a classic case of too many cooks in the kitchen.

Tyreek Hill has been a monster for the Chiefs all year and leads the league in total touchdowns with 16. He also ranks fourth in the NFL with 1,158 receiving yards. Meanwhile, the top spot for receiving yards goes to Travis Kelce, who as a tight-end is on pace to shatter George Kittle‘s single-season record of 1,377 yards by a tight end.

Kelce is currently sitting at 1,250 receiving yards through 13 games. He’s on pace for 1,538 yards and the way Patrick Mahomes is slinging the rock, there’s a good chance he’ll do it.

Watkins must also contend with Mecole Hardman for targets, not to mention a dynamic backfield led by the rookie Clyde Edwards-Helaire.

The Chiefs are up against the stout New Orleans defense next week which should further limit Watkins’ production. Fantasy owners should look elsewhere for salvation.

Tight End

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Hayden Hurst, Atlanta Falcons (69% Rostered)

Hayden Hurst has been little more than an afterthought in the Atlanta Falcons offense as of late.

After starting the season relatively hot, the former Baltimore Raven is ice-cold.

Last week, Hurst caught one pass for seven yards. The week prior, he brought in one reception for nine yards. This simply won’t cut it in the playoffs.



Despite the Falcons being without their top receiver in Julio Jones, Hurst has been awful in fantasy terms. In order for fantasy owners to be content with Hurst’s output, he’ll be dependant on scoring touchdowns. It’s hard to bank on Hurst breaking the plane, as he’s only scored three touchdowns on the year. He’ll be a risky play in Week 15 when the Falcons head to Tampa Bay to take on the Buccaneers.


Check out the rest of our 2020 Fantasy Football content from our great team of writers.

About Tyler Mulligan

Tyler is a multimedia sports journalist from Toronto, Canada. He's a contributor for Fantasy Six Pack and an analyst at Pro Football Focus. His main areas of focus are football, hockey and basketball, but his heart lies in fantasy sports.

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